Tag: wordpress (page 1 of 3)

Introducing the Strong Password Generator plugin for WordPress

Today I released the Strong Password Generator plugin for WordPress.

Last week I released a plugin called Expire Passwords which is meant to harden site security by requiring certain users to change their passwords on a regular basis.

The plugin got some early users straight away, one of whom suggested that it might also be nice to give users a way to generate a strong password, making it even easier to reset it when prompted.

What a great idea! So great, in fact, that I thought it could really be a standalone feature and plugin in it’s own right. And after a little research, I couldn’t find an existing plugin that provided the experience I was envisioning. So I built one myself.

screenshot-2

Know the purpose of your product and listen to early adopters. You might discover a completely new idea just waiting to branch off into it’s own product for users to love.

 

 

Introducing the Expire Passwords plugin for WordPress

Today I released a new plugin for WordPress called Expire Passwords.

This latest product is a continuation on my streak of other plugin releases that also deal with the topic of user session security.

The idea here is pretty simple.

If you have registrations open on your WordPress site, chances are there is a decently-sized group of users that have simply gone MIA. They have accounts, and they might come back later, but you’re just not sure when that will be.

The fact of the matter is, the more active login accounts you have on your site, the more potential opportunities there are for break-ins. And once a hacker is authenticated inside WordPress with the right kind of capabilities, the more opportunities there are to do some real damage.

This plugin is meant to mitigate the risk of unauthorized access to those stale user accounts by requiring users to reset their password on a regular basis.

Expire Passwords Screenshot-2

Furthermore, the “freshness” of passwords for all the active users on your site will also be increased. Too many users have the bad habit of using the exact same password for nearly all of their online accounts. These types of users that register for your site should be thought of as increased security risks.

The Expire Passwords plugin is an effective way to deter users from engaging in this kind of blasphemous password behavior.

Lastly, there are some market sectors such as government, banking or healthcare where security regulations may even require that password resets be performed regularly. We want those types of organizations using WordPress too, so this plugin can help them line up WordPress as a CMS with their existing corporate requirements.

As always I would love your thoughts and feedback on my latest product creation.

Are there other benefits you see that I haven’t thought of?

Let me know in the comments!

So you want to be a web developer, huh?

I get this question all the time:

Hey man, how can I learn to do what you do?  -Random citizen

And I can probably guess why they are asking it too.

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Parting ways with ChurchThemes.net and looking ahead toward a brighter future

New ChurchThemes.net

Three years ago, in July 2011, I started a theme shop. It was an era where many people in smaller niches were yet to be discovered by developers as a force to be reckoned with. The “The Long Tail” principal hadn’t yet sunk in, at least not enough for churches to have viable WordPress theme options available to them.

Churches were being grossly under-served in every WordPress theme marketplace. The most common option for them was to customize their favorite “photography” or “design agency” theme, somehow seeing past page after page of irrelevant stock imagery and the thousands of “shortcodes” they wouldn’t be using. Sprinkle in a few plugins, and say a prayer – maybe, just maybe, this would work.

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Get an attachment ID by URL in WordPress

We all know you can use wp_get_attachment_url() to return an attachment’s URL by passing in the ID, but what about the reverse scenario?

There are a lot of long-winded examples of how to get an attachment ID by URL floating around the interwebs. Most of them limit results to only returning images or use expensive DB queries. Really, there should be a function for this in core, but there isn’t.

Needless to say, I wasn’t really happy with any of the solutions I found people using, so I decided to take a stab at it.

Below is the most lightweight method I’ve come up with (so far) to get an attachment ID by passing through an attachment URL.

Example usage

Just as an example, this would echo the attachment ID integer of test-image.jpg onto the page:

<?php echo fjarrett_get_attachment_id_by_url( 'http://frankiejarrett.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/test-image.jpg' ) ?>

This would echo the same result as above because we are ignoring www usage in the URL being passed through:

<?php echo fjarrett_get_attachment_id_by_url( 'http://www.frankiejarrett.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/test-image.jpg' ) ?>

This would echo nothing, because the image doesn’t exist in the WordPress uploads directory:

<?php echo fjarrett_get_attachment_id_by_url( 'http://frankiejarrett.com/foo/test-image.jpg' ) ?>

And finally, this would also echo nothing because the URL of the file is pointing to an external domain:

<?php echo fjarrett_get_attachment_id_by_url( 'http://www.anotherdomain.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/test-image.jpg' ) ?>

Conclusion

We managed to fetch an attachment ID in just a few lines of code with no expensive DB queries! Awesome 😎

Now you can do cool things like turn a URL into an absolute path:

<?php
$url = 'http://frankiejarrett.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/05/test-image.jpg';
$attachment_id = fjarrett_get_attachment_id_by_url( $url );
$path = ( $attachment_id ) ? get_attached_file( $attachment_id ) : null;
echo $path;
?>

For more information about what was used in this function, please see:
http://php.net/manual/en/function.explode.php
http://php.net/manual/en/function.parse-url.php
http://php.net/manual/en/function.str-ireplace.php
http://codex.wordpress.org/Function_Reference/home_url
http://codex.wordpress.org/Determining_Plugin_and_Content_Directories#Constants
http://codex.wordpress.org/Class_Reference/wpdb#SELECT_a_Column

Was this code helpful to you? Let me know in the comments!

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